Double Eagle Dressage

Dressage with Vivian

Got that horse! — March 7, 2018

Got that horse!

I didn’t end up with the fellow in California. Instead, I was looking at some horses for a student, and stumbled across the (literal) horse of my dreams. OMG! I can’t believe my luck! Bravario, or Bravo as he is known, is a 17.1 hh Swedish warmblood gelding. He’s 10 years old, blood bay and just as pretty as they come. Head over to the Gallery to see him!

He’s schooling 3rd level and is just the most sensitive, balanced, and best moving horse I have ever had. What a great present for my 60th birthday! I may not achieve my medals this year, but he and I will most definitely get to Grand Prix. He has more talent in one front hoof than all my previous horses combined!

Bravo thinks only of food and treats. But he also thinks he is a golden retriever. He has no concept of his size. I just love riding him and every ride is an epiphany for me. I’ve had a few lessons on him and I never get over how incredibly powerful and light he is. He is making me a better rider.

Most of my students have had a chance to take him for a spin and they all just love him. He’s pulled school horse duty a few times, although his sensitivity and power, coupled with his size, tend to be intimidating to most. That’s OK. He’s my boy and we are good.

My turn — August 25, 2017

My turn

I have but one thing on my mind these days: my medals. I’ve had my USDF bronze medal since 2001. On a horse I trained myself. He had been a hunter when I bought him, so essentially he was working at training level with very forward flying changes.

In the course of a year, I dragged him, kicking and screaming (well it was me doing most of the kicking and screaming) to 3rd level and did it well enough to earn my bronze. The following year my husband left me with two little boys and I used that as an excuse to end my professional dressage career.

Now, 16 years down the road, the boys are grown and out of the house, I’m gainfully employed and training and teaching on the side. I haven’t competed, except for the odd schooling show here and there, in 16 years. I want to compete this year. I want my silver and gold medals and I want them in the same show season. This show season. I want them now. I’ve earned them.

I don’t presently have a horse. I have a few I could certainly train and show if I desired, but nothing doing 4th level or above, which would defeat the purpose, for me. I have a horse picked out. He’s big, chestnut with chrome (my favorite) and schooling Grand Prix. He’s an outstanding mover, has an incredible trot. I think his piaffe will be unbeatable! He’s only 14, which is fine for a competitive Grand Prix horse. The sky is the limit with this one.

I’ll be going down to California soon to try him out. Fingers crossed that he loves me as much as I already love him. 🙂

I have had a blog previously. It still exists: A Voice in the Rain. I haven’t updated it or posted anything new in over a year I’m sure. I need to get on that. This blog is specific to my other passion – other besides writing – dressage. I’ve been teaching, riding and training horses for over forty years, but focusing on dressage for about twenty-seven of those years. I’ve participated in clinics with some of the best in the world and I never stop trying to learn. Because I specialize in adult amateur riders and those new to dressage, I have developed a style and curriculum that make dressage easier to understand. Dressage is hard, make no mistake. But it doesn’t have to be impossible and it doesn’t have to take years just to get to second level. Second level seems to be the holy grail for a lot of adult amateurs for some reason. In my experience, all horses (with the exception of gaited breeds perhaps) can be trained to the competitive equivalent of 4th level. There is no reason why not. Would they all be competitive in the show ring? Probably not, but there is nothing up to that point that the average horse cannot do well enough to improve him. Over the course of this blog, I will cover those topics that I have learned bring the most frustration and angst to lower level riders. I welcome comments and questions. I don’t welcome snark, but reasonable and polite debate is good for the sport. Lay it on me. Check back once a month or so for new installments. — December 2, 2016

I have had a blog previously. It still exists: A Voice in the Rain. I haven’t updated it or posted anything new in over a year I’m sure. I need to get on that. This blog is specific to my other passion – other besides writing – dressage. I’ve been teaching, riding and training horses for over forty years, but focusing on dressage for about twenty-seven of those years. I’ve participated in clinics with some of the best in the world and I never stop trying to learn. Because I specialize in adult amateur riders and those new to dressage, I have developed a style and curriculum that make dressage easier to understand. Dressage is hard, make no mistake. But it doesn’t have to be impossible and it doesn’t have to take years just to get to second level. Second level seems to be the holy grail for a lot of adult amateurs for some reason. In my experience, all horses (with the exception of gaited breeds perhaps) can be trained to the competitive equivalent of 4th level. There is no reason why not. Would they all be competitive in the show ring? Probably not, but there is nothing up to that point that the average horse cannot do well enough to improve him. Over the course of this blog, I will cover those topics that I have learned bring the most frustration and angst to lower level riders. I welcome comments and questions. I don’t welcome snark, but reasonable and polite debate is good for the sport. Lay it on me. Check back once a month or so for new installments.

ellie


					
First blog post —
Blog post title —
Viv’s Views —

Viv’s Views

I have had a blog previously. It still exists: A Voice in the Rain. I haven’t updated it or posted anything new in over a year I’m sure. I need to get on that. This blog is specific to my other passion – other besides writing – dressage. I’ve been teaching, riding and training horses for over forty years, but focusing on dressage for about twenty-seven of those years. I’ve participated in clinics with some of the best in the world and I never stop trying to learn. Because I specialize in adult amateur riders and those new to dressage, I have developed a style and curriculum that make dressage easier to understand. Dressage is hard, make no mistake. But it doesn’t have to be impossible and it doesn’t have to take years just to get to second level. Second level seems to be the holy grail for a lot of adult amateurs for some reason. In my experience, all horses (with the exception of gaited breeds perhaps) can be trained to the competitive equivalent of 4th level. There is no reason why not. Would they all be competitive in the show ring? Probably not, but there is nothing up to that point that the average horse cannot do well enough to improve him. Over the course of this blog, I will cover those topics that I have learned bring the most frustration and angst to lower level riders. I welcome comments and questions. I don’t welcome snark, but reasonable and polite debate is good for the sport. Lay it on me. Check back once a month or so for new installments.